I Wish you Enough

My Mother posted this to my nephew on Facebook (she reposted from who knows who or where):

Recently, I overheard a mother and daughter in their last moments together at the airport as the daughter’s departure had been announced. Standing near the security gate, they hugged and the mother said: “I love you and I wish you enough.”

The daughter replied, “Mom, our life together has been more than enough. Your love is all I ever needed. I wish you enough, too, Mom.” They kissed and the daughter left.

The mother walked over to the window where I sat. Standing there, I could see she wanted and needed to cry. I tried not to intrude on her privacy but she welcomed me in by asking, “Did you ever say good-bye to someone knowing it would be forever?”

“Yes, I have,” I replied. “Forgive me for asking but why is this a forever good-bye?”

“I am old and she lives so far away. I have challenges ahead and the reality is the next trip back will be for my funeral,” she said.

When you were saying good-bye, I heard you say, “I wish you enough.” May I ask what that means?”

She began to smile. “That’s a wish that has been handed down from other generations. My parents used to say it to everyone.” She paused a moment and looked up as if trying to remember it in detail and she smiled even more. “When we said ‘I wish you enough’ we were wanting the other person to have a life filled with just enough good things to sustain them”.

Then turning toward me, she shared the following, reciting it from memory, “I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright. I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun more.I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive. I wish you enough pain so that the smallest joys in life appear much bigger. I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting. I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess. I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final good-bye.” She then began to cry and walked away.

They say it takes a minute to find a special person. An hour to appreciate them. A day to love them. And an entire life to forget them.

Bring Back Donna Noble (to Doctor Who)

doctor donnaDonna Noble (Catherine Tate) is special. She was one of the very few (if only) Doctor Who companions who was a mate, just a friend and yet a really good friend. Donna started with a Christmas episode with the 10th Doctor. She was swept away from her wedding and off to an adventure with Doctor Who.

At one point Donna was the most important woman in all of creation (she saved the whole of reality from the Daleks). Then she was left back at home to go on with her life, not even knowing she had been so much more.Her adventure ended (far too soon) when the Doctor had to erase her memory of everything they had done and accomplished together. It was a tragic ending. A sad ending.

Donna Noble should have had so much better. In a later episode they brought her back as the 10th Doctor was dying – as a way of making amends (to fans I think) Donna was given a winning lottery ticket as she married someone else. To wrap things up with a tidy bow – the money for the ticket came from her Father who was deceased in the present.

Donna was gone too soon. She had so much potential and so much more storyline could have been developed – it wasn’t right to take her away and try to tie up the loose ends in a pretty bow for fans.

How could I ever go back to normal life after seeing this? I’m going to travel with that man forever. Donna Noble.

Why are Coins Left on Gravestones?

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COINS LEFT ON TOMBSTONES

While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave.

These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America’s military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin.

A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier’s family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect. Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.

A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the solider when he was killed.

According to tradition, the money left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for indigent veterans.

In the US, this practice became common during the Vietnam war, due to the political divide in the country over the war; leaving a coin was seen as a more practical way to communicate that you had visited the grave than contacting the soldier’s family, which could devolve into an uncomfortable argument over politics relating to the war.

Some Vietnam veterans would leave coins as a “down payment” to buy their fallen comrades a beer or play a hand of cards when they would finally be reunited.

The tradition of leaving coins on the headstones of military men and women can be traced to as far back as the Roman Empire.

This was on Facebook today.

My Ghost Town « Mosaic Daisy

I took a lot of photographs, that did not fully hit me until I looked at them. I feel like these ghost towns, forgotten, no one knowing what my purpose is or was, neglected, left to decay. This made me reflect on my parents who have not been in my life for over a quarter century (with a blip in between where they temporarily gave into my persistent requests to have them in my life, then they vanished again). Because my parents never wanted me (and never held back telling me this) I have felt hollow, empty.. seeing the ghost town I felt like it reflected how I felt, lost, abandoned, forgotten.

via My Ghost Town « Mosaic Daisy.

Nothing too Good for a Cowboy on TV

I couldn’t find “Nothing too Good for a Cowboy” on TV after seeing it by chance more than a month ago. Tonight, after a blow up with my sister that has left me with a headache and other things, I found it again. Just as I was going to lose myself in a hot shower. So I missed a lot of the show in the beginning and then during the shower. But, it didn’t really matter. It’s just so nice to see it and I already know the general plot after reading one of the books the show is based on. Anyway, now I looked it up and know when it is on. Just have to remember it for next week.

Red Jasper

Some stones radiate high levels of energy, such as quartz (especially in smoky or rutilated form). Others work much more slowly. One of these is red jasper. In some Native American cultures red jasper is considered to be the symbolic blood of the earth, and it’s generally thought to be one of the best stones for connecting with the deep, stabilizing energies of the earth.

In the chakra system red relates to emotions, and of all the red stones it is the least volatile. Jasper is a stone which makes its effects known slowly and gradually.

It is considered an emotionally calming stone, and can be an excellent stone for either those who are hypersensitive to crystalline energy and find it difficult to work with, or for those who like change to be a gradual, unfolding process.

In this context it is particularly recommended for gem essences. It’s also a very good stone to use when someone is upset, and needs to be calmed down.

Found at: Our Glass Wire –

I had a red jasper stone wired into necklace a couple of weeks ago. I really liked it. But then I lost it for a few days this week. Things went a bit bad this week. I don’t give a stone credit for causing a bad week but for some reason I feel it was connected. Maybe because I choose the red jasper as a stone for myself, giving myself space/ permission to make life changes, accept some things and change others. Anyway, it was on my mind a lot while it was missing. Tonight my Mom found it. I had left it with a work shirt, it must have come off when I took off the shirt.

Anyway, it’s back now.