The Eighth Day

I happened to have Murdoch Mysteries on this afternoon. I wasn’t paying full attention to it but I did catch part of the show. One of the policemen/ detectives was telling Murdoch his theories of how the universe came to be. He started by saying his Grandmother was a church going woman who believed God created everything in seven days. Then the policeman/ detective went on to expand on his thoughts about all of that. I can’t remember all of it now.

What caught my attention was the 8th day theory. First, what if God’s idea of a day is different from our own. Maybe one sunset to the next sunrise isn’t a day when you’re an omnipotent being of some kind. What if God’s day is billions of years to us. What if the 7th day is still ongoing and one day we find ourselves with all kinds of new wonders as the 8th day starts and God begins creating again, after his break on the 7th day?

Isn’t that a neat theory?

I don’t believe in God or Goddess but I do think there had to have been something which started everything at some point. Something which sorted out life, death and everything. Do you really think everything could have just happened by evolution, luck or happenstance?

Scrap Club: A New Twist on Recycling

the bottom line is that we supply you with sledgehammers, crowbars, bats and pipes to destroy various household objects such as tvs, washing machines, cookers, computers, musical instruments, office furniture and the occasional car….all the objects are sourced from the streets usually dumped and/or are donated to us as useless objects beyond their original use….everything destroyed is scrap…if it works we don’t use it….safety is of course paramount so you will be provided with professional safety equipment such as goggles, helmets and gloves professional first-aiders are always on hand just in case…..names are chosen randomly, 10 people at a time get 10 minutes in the ‘scrap pit’ and everybody gets a turn….

via What happens | Scrapclub.

Found History

Found History explores public history and digital humanities in all their forms. By taking seriously the work of amateurs and professionals alike, as well as new modes of digital scholarship and learning, Found History aims to foster a broader, more democratic understanding of what history and the humanities are.

I like the idea for this blog. Basically, finding history around you and posting about it. It’s not a blog with a lot of updates. It’s found history, you can’t control what you find or how you find it at the time. I’ve seen other sites about found items like postcards, photographs, hand drawn maps, etc. Each of those is a found history in itself. But there is so much more to history. History happens all around us, every day and in every way.

Treasure Hunt in the Library (New York)

NY Public Library to hold overnight treasure hunt – Yahoo! News.

NEW YORK – The majestic main branch of the New York Public Library is seeking 500 people to spend the night there on a scavenger hunt designed to tap into their inner creativity and potential as they explore its miles of rare treasures.

The hunt, called “Find the Future: The Game,” was created for the library’s centennial celebration by Jane McGonigal, renowned for designing games that tackle real-world problems.

“We realized that if we could bring players face to face with these treasures, these world-changing objects from the past, they would be able to tap into their own world-changing potential,” said McGonigal, the author of the best-seller “Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World.”

Would-be scavengers at the midtown Manhattan library can register on a website going online Friday. Each needs to complete a written challenge, or quest, for the chance to play the game, which starts on May 20 at 8 p.m. and ends the next day at 6 a.m.

“We want people to engage with their imaginations, their creativity,” said Caro Llewellyn, the producer of the library’s centennial celebration.

The goal of the game is for people to write stories about the kind of future they want to see and the kind of world they envision, she said.

It’s an opportunity, McGonigal added, for people to “leave their own legacy.”